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Old 12-23-2008, 09:56 AM
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Default 2009 MITSUBISHI LANCER RALLIART EQUIPPED WITH 6-speed TC-SST

2009 MITSUBISHI LANCER RALLIART EXCLUSIVELY EQUIPPED WITH
6-SPEED TWIN-CLUTCH SPORTRONIC® SHIFT TRANSMISSION (TC-SST)


The 2009 Mitsubishi Lancer Ralliart is exclusively equipped with a modified version of the advanced 6-speed Twin-Clutch Sportronic® Shift Transmission (TC-SST) that debuted in the new-generation Lancer Evolution MR. The TC-SST, is capable of executing lightning-quick upshifts with no drop-off in engine power.
In the Lancer Ralliart, the TC-SST provides two operation modes, Normal and Sport, but not the S-Sport mode provided in the Lancer Evolution MR model for ultimate performance driving. Also, 5th and 6th gear ratios are slightly higher in the Lancer Ralliart than in the Evolution MR to reduce highway-driving engine speed and to help enhance fuel economy.
As on the Lancer Evolution MR, the driver can manually control TC-SST shifting using the console shifter or the Sportronic steering wheel magnesium-alloy paddle shifters, or can select fully automatic operation. The TC-SST executes shifts more quickly and consistently than a driver could with a pure manual transmission. The TC-SST provides the engaging driving experience and engine-control benefits of a manual transmission, but without the need to use a clutch pedal. And in automatic “Normal” mode, the TC-SST provides quick, seamless shifts with better fuel efficiency than a conventional torque converter automatic transmission.

How TC-SST Works
The TC-SST, for all its advanced capability, uses a less complex structure than a conventional torque converter automatic transmission. Advanced electronic and hydraulic controls allow the precision operation required to make the transmission suitable for a road car. Essentially, the TC-SST is a manual transmission that can select two gears at a time: one gear is engaged by one of the two wet multi-plate, electro-hydraulically operated clutches, and the other is pre-selected, awaiting to be engaged by the second wet multi-plate clutch.
Gear changes are made – either manually or automatically, depending on mode selected – when the clutches are “swapped,” which occurs simultaneously, with no perceptible lag time. Upshifts and downshifts occur in just a fraction of a second, with a longer interval necessary on downshifts for the engine control module to “blip” the throttle to match engine and transmission speeds.
In principal, the TC-SST behaves like two three-speed manual transmissions operating on the same output shaft. The odd-number gears and even-number gears are on separate input shafts, and each shaft is connected to an individual clutch. The odd and even gear shafts are linked via a transfer gear, which results in a shorter overall transmission length. The transmission ECU, sensors and solenoids are all housed within the transmission valve body. The TC-SST is equipped with a transmission-oil cooler. As do many manual transmissions, the TC-SST uses automatic transmission fluid (ATF).

Shifting Options
In the Lancer Ralliart, the TC-SST offers two drive modes – Normal and Sport – and within each, the driver may choose Automatic or Manual shifting. Whether the driver shifts manually or selects an Automatic mode, the TC-SST functions in the same manner.
The console-mounted shifter has four positions, similar to a conventional automatic transmission: P, R, N and D. With “P” or “N” selected, the transmission control module (TCM) pre-selects 2nd and Reverse gears, with each clutch free as preparation for selection.
Selecting D, shift fork #1 is moved to the 1st gear side, meshes with first gear and gradually engages clutch #1 (for odd-number gears). Simultaneously, the TC-SST pre-selects 2nd gear by moving shift fork #2 to the 2nd gear side, where it rests meshed with 2nd gear. With the transmission in D and the vehicle at a stop, the clutch is intentionally slipped (in R, as well) to provide “creep” as in a conventional automatic or continuously variable transmission. Pressing the accelerator pedal fully engages the clutch, and the car moves.
At an upshift (manual or automatic), clutch #1 disengages while clutch #2 simultaneously engages; the shift, or “torque handover,” is accomplished through the clutch swap. Simultaneously, 3rd gear is pre-selected in the same manner, and so on. The handoff from one clutch to the other means that there is always a clutch engaged, resulting in faster and smoother shifts with no torque loss; there is no perceptible “on/off” as there is in a conventional manual transmission or a single-clutch automated manual.

Manual and Automatic
The choice of Automatic and Manual operation in the TC-SST makes this transmission a versatile choice for both maximum performance and convenience. If the driver leaves the shifter in D, shifting is fully automatic, and the driver has control over shifting behavior through two selectable drive modes: Normal and Sport. The default mode is Normal. In Automatic operation, each drive mode controls shifting according to its own shift map and in response to various inputs from the engine, the steering, wheel speed sensors and the AWC computer.
The drive mode switch is located behind the shifter on the console. Pushing it forward (“+”) changes drive mode to Sport. The driver can switch between Normal and Sport modes at any time or vehicle speed. While in any drive mode, the driver can change to manual mode at any time by using the paddle shifters (details in next subsection.)
For most daily driving situations, Normal mode uses relatively low-speed shift points to deliver unobtrusive shifting for maximum comfort together with optimum fuel economy. Sport mode uses higher shift points and quicker shifting to deliver instant throttle response for better performance feel. Sport mode is also useful for driving in mountainous areas or when engine braking is required.

Special Automatic Talents
As it does in the Lancer Evolution MR model, the TC-SST provides near-telepathic response when driving in D (Automatic). While in D, in either of the two drive modes, the TCM continuously takes input from engine operating parameters, including engine speed and torque, as well as information from the AWC computer. The driver can expect, therefore, that the TC-SST will select the best gear for any given cornering situation.
As with a conventional automatic transmission, the TC-SST provides a kick-down function, quickly selecting a lower gear when the accelerator pedal is suddenly pressed to the floor. Shifting intelligence will hold lower gears while the vehicle is ascending an incline (for power) or descending (for engine braking). Here again, pulling one of the paddle shifters will instantly switch the transmission into manual mode to give the driver even more control.


Manual Operation
In either of the TC-SST’s two drive modes – Normal and Sport – the driver can select Manual operation, and the drive mode chosen affects shifting speed. Normal mode provides the smoothest shifting and is ideal for urban driving. Sport mode will quicken the shifts and is ideal for country or mountain road driving.
The driver selects Manual operation in two ways: (1) with the console shifter, by pulling it back past D and then leftward into the Manual slot. Then, pulling the shifter rearward (“+”) selects and upshift, and pushing it forward (“-”) selects a downshift.

(2) If the driver selects D with the console shift (Automatic mode), pulling on either of the magnesium steering wheel paddle shifters at any time afterward will immediately switch the transmission to Manual mode. The right side steering wheel paddle is for upshifts (“+”) and left side for downshifts (“-”). In either case, when the TC-SST is in Manual mode, there are absolutely no automatic shift changes, except at full stop when 1st gear is automatically selected.
If the console shift is in D, then the transmission will revert to Automatic mode when the car comes to a very slow crawl or stops. If the console shift is in the Manual slot, the transmission will automatically shift to 1st gear at a stop or very slow speed (as it will in D), but it will remain in Manual mode when the driver accelerates again.
While the car is in motion, the driver can switch between Manual and Automatic modes at any speed. Pulling the upshift paddle (“+”) and holding it for one second will switch the TC-SST into Automatic mode. Pulling the downshift paddle (“-”), however, always results in a quick downshift. When the driver turns off the ignition, the engine will run for about two seconds while 2nd and Reverse gears are disengaged from pre-selection.

TC-SST Shifter
The magnesium steering wheel paddle shifters and the console shifter for the TC-SST in the Lancer Ralliart are the same as in the Lancer Evolution. Mitsubishi specially designed the console shifter to impart a different feel than shifters used on conventional automatic transmissions that offer some form of manual control.
In the Manual slot, the shifter will feel more like a manual transmission shifter, and there is even a pull-ring used to engage Reverse gear. (The shift knob, in fact, is the same type as used in the previous-generation Lancer Evolution MR, which used a pure manual transmission.)

For safety, like a conventional automatic transmission, the TC-SST features a shift-lock mechanism that locks the shifter in Park unless the brake pedal is depressed. The shift lever assembly is networked with the engine control module (ECM), transmission control module (TCM) and various ECUs via the CAN bus. As a backup, it is also networked via the Local Integrated Network (LIN), a new European standard making its Mitsubishi debut in the Lancer Evolution and Ralliart models.


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Old 03-31-2010, 12:02 PM
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Default That is Good BUT

But what about the torq cut off befor the clutch starts to slip it is strang how so many sports car use this same style tran and have over 500 torq and handle fine but in the MR and Ralliart have a realy low torq cap befor slip.
Like the GTR and merc SLR push over 400 torq and handle the power perfect but are based on the same tran.
So can this problem be fixed with a ect flash or by replaceing internals?
I have seen a blog about this on evom forums but no body was able to find a fix for this big problem for any tuner-racer for ralliart.
What do u think and if any one herd about any work on this problem.
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Old 06-22-2011, 07:59 PM
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I would love for someone to give some information. I'm doing a turbo swap and nobody can tell me specifically what the limits are of this SST. Some fail at 300tq and some are ok above that. I'm going to sell my car if there isnt a solution to get more then 300
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Old 06-23-2011, 08:21 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Rall1art View Post
I would love for someone to give some information. I'm doing a turbo swap and nobody can tell me specifically what the limits are of this SST. Some fail at 300tq and some are ok above that. I'm going to sell my car if there isnt a solution to get more then 300
There is a solution. Upgrade your transmission. The stock unit can hold more than 300 ft/lbs. Ask me how I know.

I have said this before, and I will say it again. The initial failures were the result of, for the most part, incorrect tuning. If the power is delivered correctly, these cars don't appear to have a problem. I believe that the stock clutches are good for 400/400 (delivered properly and not beat on). I have a set of Kevlar clutches in development that should raise that number to 500/500 (even with a little abuse). SSP makes clutch packs that will boost that number up to 800/800. I have even heard that Exedy (I think that that is correct) is about to release a set of clutches that bumps that up even higher (for a much higher cost).

The reality is that there are several things that go into the longevity of these transmissions. One is fluid pressure and viscosity. With better fluid, you will see lower overall temperatures and better response times during disengagement and re-engagement of the clutches. SSP also makes an upgraded seal kit. This will allow for higher fluid pressure to develop within the transmission. That wasn't an original idea. This kind of thing has been done with other cars for a while now. Mitsubishi is late to this game.

If you are really concerned about your transmission, start looking at other forums pertaining to cars with similar platforms. There are a number of Audi sites that discuss ways of bumping up your transmission performance. The GT-R has a similar transmission. Some of their ideas are already being applied to the RA and MR.

I have been looking into replacement solenoids for the transmission for a while now. That is being taken care of, as well.

The bottom line is that the information that you are looking for is out there. Not all of it is on forums in this country (hint hint).

Your motor will fail before your transmission will at the power levels.
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Old 06-23-2011, 08:22 AM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by hackerrei View Post
But what about the torq cut off befor the clutch starts to slip it is strang how so many sports car use this same style tran and have over 500 torq and handle fine but in the MR and Ralliart have a realy low torq cap befor slip.
The difference is the pressure within the transmission. That makes all of the difference in the world.
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Old 06-23-2011, 11:04 AM
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He is 200% correct. Other than that I would highly recommend a transcooler from ams.
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Old 06-25-2011, 07:32 AM
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Originally Posted by Krisko View Post
He is 200% correct. Other than that I would highly recommend a transcooler from ams.
Based on what?

I am hearing (first hand) that the big-daddy cooler from SSP (which is twice the size) still overheats on the track. I suspect that neither one, from what I gather, is sufficiently track tested.
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Old 06-25-2011, 01:27 PM
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Originally Posted by NFSLancerRA View Post
Based on what?

I am hearing (first hand) that the big-daddy cooler from SSP (which is twice the size) still overheats on the track. I suspect that neither one, from what I gather, is sufficiently track tested.
I'm pretty confident in the SSP cooler - and they run it on their MR track car, so I would say that's track tested. I will be looking to add this to my car down the line

It's the AMS cooler that I think is a bit of a joke. the SSP is a real cooling system compared to AMS's, which is more of an upgraded stock cooler. that I have heard 100% from users say it didn't help much at all on the track - and AMS is looking to get into MR R&D, so I'm sure they really know how average it is as far as performance and are looking to produce something better

but overall most people don't need an aftermarket transmission cooler for mostly street driving. bryan's sportback is a great example
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Old 06-25-2011, 08:49 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by Exyia View Post
but overall most people don't need an aftermarket transmission cooler for mostly street driving. bryan's sportback is a great example
Same here... I never plan on taking my car to the track so I don't find the need to upgrade mine.
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Old 06-25-2011, 10:32 PM
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It can never hurt to get a better fan for the stocker core, and they are fairly cheap.

Has any logged data using a fog light -> trans-cooler duct?

The SSP has loads of surface space but hides behind the front end.

Would live to see more temp numbers on this and any other items that may show up in logs.
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